7 Musts To Nurture The Millennial Business Analyst Career

Millennials are reshaping the modern work-force – rethink the modern work-place and nurture the millennial business analyst career with these 7 musts.

By 2020 millennials will form 50% of the workforce, yet the world of work today has been shaped by those before us, by the baby boomers, the generation defined by financial stability, long hours of work and the corner office. The future is for the millennials, the generation of influencers, collaborators and ambition.

Are you ready to shift your engagement strategies to appeal to this modern generation? To harness the power of the millennial business analyst you need to be.

Here are your 7 musts to nurture the millennial business analyst career:

  1. Build a brand that resonates

In a world where Google is king and nothing is left in the dark; millennials are super-savvy in researching everything there is to know about a prospective employer. One of the key fundamental blocks to attracting top millennial business analyst talent is the employment brand.

Millennials are seeking organisations that are not only concerned with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and the organisations bottom-line; millennials place a strong emphasis on conscious companies and social responsibility.

We are looking for a bigger picture and the opportunity to contribute to a cause.

  1. Work that matters

Whilst previous generations were primarily concerned with receiving a regular salary-slip each month, employers must realise that the focus is different for millennials. Millennial business analysts need purposeful and meaningful work, work that is closely aligned to their interests, skills and career aspirations. Now, some may characterise this attitude as demanding and self-centred — asking for too much from a job, or that sense of entitlement kicking in – but in reality millennials are ‘job crafters’, we simply want to mould our jobs to be more meaningful – to be more than just the job description we’ve signed up for – to make a difference.

In order to retain a strong and productive workforce, employers need to understand how to create environments that focus on work that matters.

  1. Inspirational leaders

Traditionally the role of a manager is to make sure that instruction is given, that direction is followed and that KPIs are met, and is typically a position where respect is given and not necessarily earned. Today, millennials see things a little bit differently, and we are seeking out leaders rather than bosses.

Millennials are carefully choosing experts to help us navigate and make every success of our career, by seeking out inspirational people who have the ability to lead, challenge and empower us on our journey towards success.

  1. Path of opportunity

Ping-pong tables and Friday afternoon drinks are great perks. After all, who doesn’t enjoy them? But, millennials also need opportunities to continuously develop our skills in a meaningful way. We are actively looking for opportunities to grow and develop, which feedback and confirm that we are showing signs of progression.

The opportunity to learn new skills and connect is a key factor in our job satisfaction. Employers need to set clear expectations on the opportunities for growth and development, whether it be opportunities to work on projects that stretch and grow skills, or work that’s aligned to gain hours towards professional certification. Fail to do that and you’ll find yourself with a disgruntled and frustrated millennial, one who is more than happy to look for greener pastures elsewhere.

  1. Mentorship and development

For most new Business Analysts, the techniques and tools that you need to wrap your head around can be vast and daunting. Most, probably find themselves asking the question: ‘How am I possibly going to know which tool or technique to use when?’ This where great coaching and mentoring can really have an impact.

Coaching and mentoring plays a key role in career development, offering objective perspective and guidance on how to navigate a successful career. We are extremely ambitious and have high expectations of ourselves. Organisations need to support millennials by providing guidance as an integral part of the personal development strategy.

  1. Talk with us snappily

Earlier generations were more contented with the annual performance review system, which comes and goes intermittently. Millennials are the generation of Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram. The ‘real time’ generation that is constantly switched on, and a similar communication style is needed in the workplace.

Millennials thrive with immediate and constant feedback, with ongoing constructive conversations to continually improve our performance by highlighting blind spots and confirming positive behaviour. Hearing from you once or twice a year just won’t do.

  1. Recognise our worth

The motivation to do more, to do better is very much linked to being recognised and rewarded for our efforts. We are an ambitious generation, and being rewarded and recognised for great work regularly is just adding more fuel to drive that ambition. Employers need to understand how to motivate, reward and recognise the millennial business analyst.

Providing regular feedback, personalised rewards and (let’s dare to say it) remuneration incentives that recognise good work and efforts are ways to ensure continued motivation to do better.

To make sure you don’t miss out on the power of the millennial generation you will have to adapt your employee engagement strategies by rethinking ‘how things are done’ and reshaping them to ‘how things should be done’.

 

7 Musts To Nurture The Millennial Business Analyst Career’ was originally featured on BCMG. Follow @SaratogaSA for business analysis insights.